Aerobic Fitness Test

This simple run test was developed by Dr. Ken Cooper in 1968 to measure aerobic fitness and provide and estimate of VO2 max for the military. VO2 max, or maximal oxygen uptake, is one factor that can determine an athlete's capacity to perform sustained exercise and is linked to aerobic endurance. VO2 max refers to the maximum amount of oxygen that an individual can utilise during intense or maximal exercise. It is measured as "millilitres of oxygen used in one minute per kilogram of body weight."  The run test is still used today and is a simple way to assess aerobic fitness. Clearly, this test is for runners, and should be done after a thorough warm up. It's also best performed on a track so you can accurately measure distance. Simply plug the distance you ran in 12 minutes into one of these formulas to get an estimate of your VO2Max.
•    In Miles: VO2max = (35.97 x miles) - 11.29.
•    In Kilometers: VO2max = (22.351 x kilometers) - 11.288
VO2 max results vary greatly. The average for a sedentary individual is close to 35 ml/kg/min. Elite endurance athletes often average 70 ml/kg/min. One of the highest recorded VO2 max results (90 ml/kg/min) was that of a cross country skier. Cyclist Lance Armstrong's VO2 max was reported at 85 ml/kg/min.


Upper Body Strength Test

The push-up test has been around for a very long time because it is simple and effective, both as an upper body exercise and as a way to measure upper body strength and fitness. You can check your own upper body strength and monitor your progress by performing this test every few months.

Strength and endurance in the muscles of the upper body, specifically the chest, shoulders, triceps and core is a good indication of overall fitness. This simple exercise engages muscles throughout the entire body -- from head to toe -- in order to maintain a rigid position. Upper body strength and endurance is essential for athletes such as swimmers, climbers, or golfers who demand strength and power from their arms and shoulder to perform well and avoid injury. But a strong upper body is also important for everyone who wants to perform everyday movements, such as carrying luggage or picking up children, with ease and without risking injury.

While performing push ups, you lift nearly 75% of your total body weight. Using a modified push-up position reduces this amount to about 60% of your total body weight.


Standard Push Up Test

•    Perform a short warm up before performing any fitness testing.
•    Begin in a push up position on hands and toes with hands shoulder-width apart and elbows fully extended.
•    While keeping a straight line from the toes, to hips, and to the shoulders, lower your upper body so your elbows bend to 90 degrees.
•    Push back up to the start position.
•    That is one rep.
•    Continue with this form and complete as many repetitions as possible without breaking form.
•    Record the total number of full push ups completed.

Modified Push Up-Test

A modified version of the test is used for women, who tend to have less relative upper body strength than men. The test is conducted in the same way as above, but uses a modified, "on the knee" push-up position.

•    Perform a short warm up before performing any fitness testing.
•    Begin in a modified push up position, on the hands and knees with hands shoulder-width apart and elbows fully extended.
•    Drop the hips, and move the hands forward until you create a straight line from the knees, to the hips, and to the shoulders.
•    While keeping a straight position from the knees to the shoulders, lower your upper body so your elbows bend to 90 degrees.
•    Push back up to the start position.
•    That is one rep.
•    Continue with this form and complete as many repetitions as possible without breaking form.
•    Record the total number of full modified push ups completed.  

 

Results

 

 

Men                  Age: 50-59           Age: 60+
Excellent          34 or more           29 or more
Good                25-34                   20-29
Average           15-24                   10-19
Poor                   8-14                     5-9
Very Poor           8 or fewer            5 or fewer


Women             Age: 50-59           Age: 60+
Excellent           29 or more           19 or more
Good                15-29                      5-19
Average             6-14                       3-4
Poor                   2-5                        1-2
Very Poor           2 or fewer             1 or fewer

 


The Core Muscle Strength & Stability Test

The objective of this evaluation is to monitor the development and improvements of an athlete's core strength and endurance over time.

The Test
1.    Position a watch or clock where you can easily see it
2.    Start in the Plank Exercise Position (elbows on the ground)
Hold for 60 seconds
3.    Lift your right arm off the ground
Hold for 15 seconds
4.    Return your right arm to the ground and lift the left arm off the ground
Hold for 15 seconds
5.    Return your left arm to the ground and lift the right leg off the ground
Hold for 15 seconds
6.    Return your right leg to the ground and lift the left leg off the ground
Hold for 15 seconds
7.    Lift your left leg and right arm off the ground
Hold for 15 seconds
8.    Return you left leg and right arm to the ground
9.    Lift your right leg and left arm off the ground
Hold for 15 seconds
10.    Return to the Plank Exercise Position (elbows on the ground)
Hold this position for 30 seconds
Results
Good Core Strength
If you can complete the test fully, you have good core strength.
Poor Core Strength
If you can not complete the test fully, your core strength needs improvement.
Poor core strength results in unnecessary torso movement and swaying during all other athletic movements. This results in wasted energy and poor biomechanics. Good core strength indicates that the athlete can move with high efficiency.
•    If you are unable to complete the test practice the routine three or four times each week until you improve.
•    By comparing your results over time, you will note improvements or declines in core strength.






Lower Body Strength Test

The wall squat test will primarily measure how strong your quads are, however the hamstring and glute muscles will also come into play. It is a good assessment to do because not only will it give you a good idea on how you are progressing with your workouts but it will also enable you to see in general how capable these muscles are.

In every day life you are constantly moving in and out of this position, such as when you sit down in a chair or else walk up a staircase therefore being strong in these muscles will be very beneficial.

The objective of the Wall Squat test is to evaluate the strength of your quads, hamstrings and glutes, and consequently, the success of your training regime.
o    To start the wall squat test first stand with your back flat against a wall, your feet about a foot away and shoulder width apart.
o    Begin to squat down, keeping the small of your back pressed firmly into the wall and ensuring that your knees are tracking properly over your toes.
o    Go down until you are in a comfortable position (around a 90 degree angle) and are not feeling any excess strain on the knee joint. Try and then hold this position for up to one minute, or until you can no longer maintain proper form.
You may wish to repeat the test two more times and then use the best reading you achieve, however do allow yourself a good period of rest in between to allow the legs to recover

What results you'll get

Compare your scores with the following standards (measured in seconds). These results are for people up to age of 50, for every 10 year block after, reduce standard by 5 seconds-

 

                    Very Poor    Poor          Below average       Average      Above average    Good           Excellent
Men                8-14        15-21             22-23                    24-17            28-32                33-38          >38
Women                           6-13              14-17                    18-21            22-26                27-32          >32



This test measures the strength and endurance of the quadricep and hamstring muscles of your thighs, and the glutes of your buttocks, and consequently evaluates your training program.