Here are some articles you might like to read about training - for instance why it's worth making the effort.

A Good Time to Start


When should you start thinking seriously about the physical condition in which you spend the rest of your life?

According to the slogan current in the 1960's "Today is the first day of the rest of your life", so whatever day it is, today is always the day to accept that this is an issue of immediate importance and to start doing something about it. However, you can't necessarily manage 

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Aerobic Exercise Best for Fat Loss, but ...?

 

So, the festive season is over - and the traditional response to the New Year is a pile of resolutions, amongst the most common of which is the intention to lose the excess weight built up over the holidays. The chances are it isn't extra muscle that you've put on, but something a lot less "useful"!

If you want to lose it, a recent study, by Leslie Willis of Duke University, North Carolina, and published in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that, in order to lose fat mass, aerobic training is more efficient than resistance training. In the study, obese subjects were randomly split into 3 groups who were assigned Aerobic Training, Resistance Training or a Combination of the two.

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Get Ready for Winter

Oh dear. It's August 5th 2012, and Usain Bolt, the fastest man in history, has just lost the Olympic men's 100m final! Why? Well, he was just coming to London for a holiday and a bit of a run, and didn't take the running part seriously enough - he didn't train enough. Sound likely? Not really (in fact we all know it didn't happen that way). Yet many people do go on a holiday in which a sporting activity plays a major part but without putting in enough (any?) work to a) get the best out out of it and b) give themselves the best chance of avoiding accident and injury. This is particularly true as you get older and don't have the 'taken for granted' strength and vitality of youth. It's not to say that you should narrow your horizons as you go through the years, you just have to make more effort in order to maintain the possibilities.

 

And as winter is upon us, we'll focus on skiing.

 

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Importance of Regular Physical Activity

The Centers for Disease Control, a US government agency, has published a feature on healthy ageing. And what do they advise? "Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do for your health".

According to their article, physical activity can reduce the risk for health in many areas from keeping your heart healthy, maintaining muscle mass in order to remain more independent on a daily basis, to reducing the risk of a "potentially disabling" injury.

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Osteoporosis - eat well and work out

 

Osteoporosis is a condition in which there is excessive reduction of calcium, the mineral that gives bones its stiffness, accompanied by loss of size. The rigidity and density of bones is important to allow our skeleton to withstand the pull of gravity and be the anchor for muscles to contract and perform our daily functions.  This is particularly important in many of the activities that Silver Grey Sports Club members participate in.

During childhood and in particular, during adolescence, there is rapid increase in bone size and density and we reach our peak bone density and mass around the age of 17-20. From then on, there is normally a natural slow and steady decline, and a sharper decline occurs after the cessation of production of sex hormones e.g. the menopause in women. 

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Sports Injuries and the Older Athlete

 

Sports injuries are described as a disruption of bone, ligament, muscle, tendon or soft tissue as a result of participation in a sporting activity.  They can be broadly classified into acute, or traumatic and cumulative, or overuse.


The description of an ‘Older athlete’ is a little more nebulous, and varies greatly between individuals.  Research has shown that from approximately the age of 40 there is a reduction in muscle mass, strength, flexibility and cardiovascular capacity.  However, that is not across the board and neither is it set in stone.  It is dependent on many factors such as training history and current activity level and of course psychological readiness.  “A 75 year old athlete may perform many times faster and be in better health than a sedentary 30 – 40 year old” Dr Vonda Wright.

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