Lily was - and is - right

Our contributor Lily Young writes in her web-published book Surfing through the Menopause about how her working on her strength an fitness for her surfing helped her during her menopause. Now comes support for her stance from The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

 

Our contributor Lily Young writes in her web-published book Surfing through the Menopause about how her working on her strength an fitness for her surfing helped her during her menopause. Now comes support for her stance from The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

 

NAMS report on a controlled study from MsFLASH Research Network investigating the effects of exercise on various menopause symptoms. The study involved 248 women either peri- or post-menopausal. One group participated in aerobic training for a 12 week period and another group pursued their normal activities. Although exercise was found to have no effect on hot flashes it did have some "small positive effects on sleep quality, insomnia, and depression".

 

There has been something of a debate about the effect of exercise on hot flashes, but this study comes down heavily on the side of of there being no evidence to "support the use of exercise as an effective treatment for hot flashes and night sweats." However, the investigators also said “Midlife women cannot expect exercise to relieve [hot flashes and night sweats] but may reasonably expect it to improve how they feel and their overall health”.

 

So, Lily was on to something. In her book she refers many times to the beneficial effects on her frame of mind and attitude to life brought about by the physical training she had to do to achieve her ambition of learning to surf. Now the scientists are catching up with her. So even if you can't jump into the cold atlantic waters to cool yourself when the hot flash strikes, help yourself to feel better all the same by exercising.