On The Pinboard you will find  stories from the media and other sources that will interest and inform you.

If you come across a story that you think would interest us, about a 90 year old mountain climber for instance, email details or a link to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

More Evidence

sgsc cyclist msgsc cyclist wWe’ve done a lot of writing about how exercise can be the best way of ageing successfully. We’ve written about how exercise can be medicine. We’ve written about Superagers, who don’t suffer the usual decrepitude of ageing, even when examination shows that they have the physical symptoms that mean they should be suffering from dementia, for instance, but they aren’t. We’ve described exercise in age as the true fountain of youth and we don’t intend to stop now. Because there is even more evidence of the truth of this, in a new study which shows how exercise operates at a fundamental level within the body to alter the commonly accepted course of ageing.


As 82 year old Professor Norman Lazarus, a co-author of the report and at the same time a subject of it, said ”If exercise was a pill, everyone would be taking it”.

Read more: More Evidence


Icon Head Sweaty ThinkingAt SGSC we endlessly write about the importance of keeping the body fit and strong in order to perform the extreme sports we all love. Within that message is the idea that by challenging themselves through these sports and activities and keeping their body in good shape to meet these challenges people will also feel good mentally, on top of the physical benefits that they will experience.


Along the same lines, and of great interest to us, there has been a study by Dr Emily Rogalski, professor of Cognitive Neurology at North Western University in Chicago, of what she calls “super-agers”. These are people aged in their 80’s, 90’s and even up to 100 who don’t exhibit the usual age-related decline in brain performance.  Her study involved following a group of 74 super-agers over several years, and these people were found to exhibit the mental sharpness and memory capacity normally associated with 50 year olds - albeit that some of the them were shown in post-mortem examination (10 of them agreed to have this done) to have the physical symptoms of dementia.

Read more: Superagers

Lose Weight....But Not Muscle

shoulder press 1.1Some new research, led by Kristen Beavers, an assistant professor of health and exercise science at Wake Forest University, sheds some light on two important and interlinked issues that concern Silver Grey athletes - keeping a healthily low body weight while maintaining adequate muscle mass for both your sports and for your health and quality of life.

This new study suggests the way to go is to combine weight training with a calorie-controlled diet and in this way to preserve lean muscle mass which can be lost through aerobic workouts.

Read more: Lose Weight....But Not Muscle

In the Swim of Life

People don't all become Silver Grey athletes in the same way or for the same reasons. In the case of Pat Gallant-Charette it was a sudden death that started her on the journey which led to her numerous records for distance swimming.


Read more: In the Swim of Life

Mimi's Race is Run - For Now


She set off with the greatest confidence and ran more than 2,000 miles in 39 days but, hugely disappointingly, multiple Guinness World Record holder Marvelous Mimi Anderson’s run across America has been called off due to injury. Just over a week ago on October 18th, having battled for several days through knee pain, an MRI scan revealed bone oedema and the risk of serious stress fractures if she carried on with the run.

Read more: Mimi's Race is Run - For Now

BBC1 - How to Stay Young

Some great television on BBC1, starting last week the second series of  “How to Stay Young”. How to Stay Young might be an off-putting title as at SGSC we think that it’s all about owning being older but at the same time being the best older you can be. However, it turns out that the programme is about the difference between what we’d call your biological age and your chronological age, which they call ‘body age’ and ‘birth age’ in the programme, and how to have a positive impact on that difference.

Read more: BBC1 - How to Stay Young